2021-01-15

Toymaker Shop Baby Dragon Pull Toy Build Day 3

The dragon is finished and ready for packing and shipping. The finish I used is something I make myself from all nontoxic materials.
 

 

Handmade Wood Toy Baby Dragon Pull Toy
Handmade Wood Toy Baby Dragon Pull Toy

 

 

 Here I have added an unfinished dragon so you can see the difference the finish makes. The finish I use is a hard paste that I heat until it is melted before apply it to the wood. I heat both the toy and the finish, so it is absorbed into the wood. I find that I get much better results by using the heat, and the high absorption significantly reduces any oily feel.


Handmade Wood Toy Baby Dragon Pull Toy
Handmade Wood Toy Baby Dragon Pull Toy


 The photo above is what the dragon pull toy looks like before finishing.

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

My Minimalistic Workbench

Handmade Wood Toy Trains Designed by Norm Marshall
Handmade Wood Toy Trains Designed by Norm Marshall


 For several years this was my workbench—some rickety sawhorses with some 2x4 across the top. I made a lot of toys and a few pieces of furniture using this bench.  

I had all my tools in a shed butted up against the edge of a concrete patio. When the weather cooperated, I would drag my tools out onto the patio and work in the hot Florida sun while watching the sky closely for convection storms building up off the coast. I sometimes waited too long and had to make a nad dash to get everything put away before the rains started.

I made and sold enough toys to buy a jointer, built a huge combination bunk bed and desk out in the hot Florida sun that sometimes hovered around 100F. I had to be careful about what I touched; some of the metal parts would get hot enough to burn my hand.

My power was an extension cord run in through a window. Fortunately, the house was wired for 20 amps to all the outlets. I never ran more than one tool at a time, so this wasn't a problem.

My dust collection was the wind.


2021-01-10

Toymaker Shop Baby Dragon Pull Toy Build Day 2

 

Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Side 2 Parts Glued In Place
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Side 2 Parts Glued In Place


I use the paper patterns to align the first set of parts and align the second set of parts to the first ones. The black clamps are from Harbor Freight Tools. These clamps work great for this sort of clamping job. At the cost of $0.99 each, they are hard to beat. The blue clamp is an Irwin micro clamp. I don't use the Irwin clamps much, but they work fine for the ears, and the small pad makes it easy to use.


Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Clamped To The Base
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Clamped To The Base

The dragon pull toy is almost done. I used a router to round over the base's corners and still had to do a lot of sanding. I have to fit the legs and tail, so the dragon sits perfectly flat and square to the surface to get a good glue joint. I sand a little and check the fit repeatedly until it is right. Then I must center the dragon on the base and keep it in place until the glue sets. The clamps hold rules to locate the dragon and prevent it from moving when clamps are applied.  Rubber bands make suitable clamps for this. These are a pain to build. I'm thinking this is going to be my last. 

Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Clamped To The Base
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Clamped To The Base


#odinstoyfactory #handmade #woodtoys

https://odinstoyfactory.etsy.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toymaker Shop Baby Dragon Pull Toy Build

Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Ready For Mounting
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Ready For Mounting

 I always make at least two when building a custom order. If something goes wrong, I don't need to start over. Breaking a piece or finding some unacceptable defect in the wood, for example.

Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Pattern Layout
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Pattern Layout


Walnut is expensive and difficult to come by where I live, so I try to be efficient as possible when laying out my patterns. I will sometimes photograph the layout when it is complicated. I must remove the patterns, cut the wood to size, apply tape, and glue the patterns. It's easy to forget the layout.

Walnut is expensive and difficult to come by where I live, so I try to be efficient as possible when laying out my patterns. I will sometimes photograph the layout when it is complicated. I must remove the patterns, cut the wood to size, apply tape, and glue the patterns. It's easy to forget the layout.
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Patterns Ready For Drilling And Cutting

There are many ways to attach patterns to wood. I like to use blue tape because it is quick, easy, and does not leave any residue when removed. I use 3M77 spray adhesive to attach the paper patterns. I like it because it holds the pattern on tight and does not lift while I am cutting. 

Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Parts Cut Out And Ready To Remove the Patterns
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Parts Cut Out And Ready To Remove the Patterns


I have to be careful when removing patterns. The blue tape sticks so well that sometimes it will pull out wood fibers.


Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Parts With The Patterns Removed
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon Parts Cut Out And Ready To Remove the Patterns

These are ready for sanding. There always seems a spot that needs smoothing on the edges. The sharp corners need to be removed. Occasionally there will be some defect in the surfaces that need to be removed. I use belt sanders for most of the sanding.

Handmade Wood Toy Dragon First Parts Glues and Clamped
Handmade Wood Toy Dragon First Parts Glues and Clamped

I glue on one side and let the glue set for 20 minutes before removing the clamps and gluing the parts on the other side. Using this method helps me keep the parts aligned. Ears and wings are not a big deal but getting the legs aligned is a necessity.



 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021-01-08

In The Toymaker Shop - Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Torpedo

Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Testing Wheel Fit
Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Testing Wheel Fit

 

 This wood toy car is going together very nicely and I think it will go weel with the panel truck.


Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Patterns Ready For Drilling
Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Patterns Ready For Drilling


The patterns are attached to blue painter's tape with 3M77 spray adhesive. The pattern on the back piece above is for a jig to locate the fenders. I will save the jig for future use. Is it worth the trouble to make the jig for one car. Yes, absolutely. Trying to get the fenders aligned on both sides without a jig is difficult at best.


Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo  Cutting The Body On A Scroll Saw
Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo  Cutting The Body On A Scroll Saw


I can cut this on my bandsaw, and it is much faster, but this is offset by the significantly increased amount of sanding I would need to do.


Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Body Fresh Of The Fire
Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Body Fresh Of The Fire

Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo All Of The Parts Are Cut Out And Ready To Sand
Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo All Of The Parts Are Cut Out And Ready To Sand


Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Front Fender On A 1-Inch Belt Sander
Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Front Fender On A 1-Inch Belt Sander

There is always some sanding to do. This is especially true when using softwoods.


Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Fenders Glued And Clamped
Handmade Wood Toy Car Torpedo Fenders Glued And Clamped


Fenders are aligned and glued on using a jig. Using the jig assures the fenders are as close to the same on both sides as possible. It is much easier to do this way.




























In The Toymaker Shop - Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Roadster

 

Handmade Wood Toy Car Roadster Complete Except for the Wheels
Handmade Wood Toy Car Roadster Complete Except for the Wheels and Paint
 

Handmade Wood Toy Car Roadster Test Fitting Fenders Before Glue Is Applied
Handmade Wood Toy Car Roadster Test Fitting Fenders Before Glue Is Applied


Making a jig for mounting the fenders assures they will be in the same place on all cars, and it is much easier to install them. To get them in place and clamped. The jig openings must be larger than the fenders and allow for some wiggle room. Fenders don't always come out the same size. 

Handmade Wood Toy Car Roadster With Fenders Mounted, Glued and Clamped
Handmade Wood Toy Car Roadster With Fenders Mounted, Glued and Clamped

The photo shows the last pair of fenders being installed. I only install one side at a time and let the glue set for at least 20 minutes before removing the clamps and the jig. Gluing and clamping one side at a time, keeps the fenders from moving around. After 20 minutes, the glue will have cured enough to hold them in place.

The little light-duty Harbor Freight trigger clamps are ideal for this type of work. I got this with a coupon for $0.99 each.

In The Toymaker Shop - Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Panel Wagon


Handmade Wood Toy Panel Wagon/Truck Testing the Wheel Fit
Handmade Wood Toy Panel Wagon/Truck Testing the Wheel Fit

I'm building a set of Fat Fendered Freaky Ford toy cars from pine wood. The Panel Wagon is probably going to be my favorite.

Handmade Wood Toy Panel Wagon/Truck Patterns Applied and Holes Drilled
Handmade Wood Toy Panel Wagon/Truck Patterns Applied and Holes Drilled

I use blue painter's tape on the wood so I can remove the patterns easily. The painter's tape sticks a bit too well and will sometimes damage the wood by pulling off some fibers. However, it is fast and easy.  


Handmade Wood Toy Panel Wagon/Truck Assembled Without the Wheels
Handmade Wood Toy Panel Wagon/Truck Assembled Without the Wheels

Here the panel truck is ready for finishing. I haven't yet decided what finish to use. I'm not too fond of stains. I'm leaning toward a polyurethane or clear shellac. Polyurethane has a long cure time, but it does a fine job of bringing out the grain.

Other options include my oil and beeswax blend, Watco Danish Oil, or acrylic paint. These are very smooth, and I'm tempted to leave them bare wood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021-01-05

Yesterday in the Shop - Bandsaw vs Scroll Saw - Fat Fendered Freaky Fords

Handmade Wood Toy Car Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Coupe
Handmade Wood Toy Car Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Coupe

 I have a Shopsmith bandsaw equipped with Carter Guides and started this project to compare cutting out these 1.5-inch thick bodies on the scroll saw with cutting them on the bandsaw. So far, my results have been inconclusive.

Handmade Wood Toy Car Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Coupe
Handmade Wood Toy Car Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Coupe

Cutting on the bandsaw is faster, but not as much as I had expected. The additional speed is offset some by the rougher cut. The rough cut made by the bandsaw requires quite a bit more sanding to get the smooth surface that I like. I'm using construction grade 2x4s for the car bodies, so I don't get a perfect cut on the scrollsaw, it is just better.

Handmade Wood Toy Car Glueing On Fenders  With A Jig
Handmade Wood Toy Car Glueing On Fenders  With A Jig

Handmade Wood Toy Car Glueing On Fenders Harbor Freight Clamps
Handmade Wood Toy Car Glueing On Fenders Harbor Freight Clamps


Handmade Wood Toy Car Coupe Body and Two Fender Glueing Jigs
Handmade Wood Toy Car Coupe Body and Two Fender Glueing Jigs

Handmade Wood Toy Car Coupe Body With Fenders Mounted
Handmade Wood Toy Car Coupe Body With Fenders Mounted


Handmade Wood Toy Car Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Pickup Truck Body With Fenders Mounted
Handmade Wood Toy Car Fat Fendered Freaky Ford Pickup Truck Body With Fenders Mounted 


2021-01-03

Bandsaw Rooster/Chicken Cut With My Shopsmith Bandsaw Equipped With Carter Guide

The rooster fresh off the saw.
The rooster fresh off the saw.

The rooster after a little sanding.
The rooster after a little sanding.

 

I have a Shopsmith bandsaw with Carter Guide (Shopsmith-SHS1) installed. I have had the Carter Guide installed for a while. I Played with it a lot to see what it could do and made a few somewhat simple projects. I have a project planned where I will be cutting some complex reindeer from a 4x4, and I wanted to see just how hard this would be before I decided to accept the commission.


I wanted to see how complicated a cut I could make with this guide and a 1/8-inch blade. I hunted for the most complex 3D pattern I could find and came up with this chicken.

The chicken is cut from a piece of construction-grade 2x4. Not once did I back up or cut any clearance to turn the blade.

Cutting the chicken's wide side was slow, partly due to the fine blade and my inexperience with this sort of cut. It worked quite well. Now I have to glue up some 4x4 blocks and try a reindeer.


Installing Bandsaw Tires On A Shopsmith Bandsaw

Installing Bandsaw Tires On A Shopsmith Bandsaw
Installing Bandsaw Tires On A Shopsmith Bandsaw
 
Installing Bandsaw Tires On A Shopsmith Bandsaw
Installing Bandsaw Tires On A Shopsmith Bandsaw

 

My first set of tires were the orange ones. They stretched and came off. I bought a pair of blue tires, and those worked well for a while and then came off and got chewed up by the blade—my fault. Putting these on was a struggle. Both times it took a couple of hours to get them on, finally.

I purchased another set of the Blue Max belts.

I changed the tires on my bandsaw yesterday for the third time. I finally figured out how to do it. I did not heat the tire or any of that nonsense. I discovered that you have to keep the wheel from moving and hold the belt in place. I have tried every sort of clamp you can imagine, only to have them pop off and go flying across the shop.

It finally dawned on me to try hand screw clamps. Hand screws are made of wood, so no worries about damaging the wheel. You can apply a lot of pressure with these clamps. Not only did they hold the belt very well, but I managed to stretch the tire onto the wheel the first try.

I used spring clamps on the bottom wheel to stop the wheel from moving when I pulled down on the tire. I didn't do this on the top wheel, and it was a bit more complicated.